Elgar: Cello Concerto - Schnittke, A.: Viola Concerto Christoph Eschenbach, Philharmonia Orchestra & David Aaron Carpenter Classical Music 2009 New Songs Albums Artists Singles Videos Musicians Remixes Image

Album: Elgar: Cello Concerto - Schnittke, A.: Viola Concerto

Artist: Christoph Eschenbach, Philharmonia Orchestra & David Aaron Carpenter

  • Genre: Classical
  • Release Date: 2009
  • Explicitness: notExplicit
  • Country: USA
  • Track Count: 7

  • Copyright: ℗ 2009 Ondine

Tracklist For Elgar: Cello Concerto - Schnittke, A.: Viola Concerto By Artist Christoph Eschenbach, Philharmonia Orchestra & David Aaron Carpenter

Title Artist Time
1
Cello Concerto In E Minor, OP. Christoph Eschenbach, Philharmonia Orchestra & David Aaron Carpenter 8:35 USD 0.99
2
Cello Concerto In E Minor, OP. Christoph Eschenbach, Philharmonia Orchestra & David Aaron Carpenter 4:35 USD 0.99
3
Cello Concerto In E Minor, OP. Christoph Eschenbach, Philharmonia Orchestra & David Aaron Carpenter 4:36 USD 0.99
4
Cello Concerto In e Minor, OP. Christoph Eschenbach, Philharmonia Orchestra & David Aaron Carpenter 11:19 USD Album Only
5
Viola Concerto: I. Largo Christoph Eschenbach, Philharmonia Orchestra & David Aaron Carpenter 5:07 USD 0.99
6
Viola Concerto: II. Allegro Mo Christoph Eschenbach, Philharmonia Orchestra & David Aaron Carpenter 13:12 USD Album Only
7
Viola Concerto: III. Largo Christoph Eschenbach, Philharmonia Orchestra & David Aaron Carpenter 17:01 USD Album Only

Reviews For Elgar: Cello Concerto - Schnittke, A.: Viola Concerto By Artist Christoph Eschenbach, Philharmonia Orchestra & David Aaron Carpenter

  • Beautiful Playing

    5
    By alfonsog2
    I have a few other recordings of the Elgar "Viola" Concerto and the sheet music. Lionel Tertis arranged the cello part for viola and played it for Elgar who sanctioned it. Interestingly the slow movement was completely in the range of the viola except for one note which either requires a scordatura of the c string or transposing up an octave. This is the best performance out of the three I have. The Schnittke follows the published score more accurately than the Bashment. This may or may not be more accurate to the intention of the part, but because Bashmet had a personal connection with Schnittke perhaps his performance practice should be followed. This ranks very high although my favorite verion of the Schnittke is by Tabea Zimmermann.
  • Passionate, Beautiful and Dramatic

    4
    By twodoggarage
    I must admit that I have been like most of the rest of you and relegated the Viola to lame duck jokes and relegated it to the shadows of its smaller sister the violin. However, Daved Aaron Carpenter has awakened new light to my ears. He is a virtuoso on the instrument. He brings lush vocal like presence to the tone and you can hear all of the emotion that Elgar and Schnitke must have felt when they wrote the pices performed here. This is a beautiful recording that I know I will be listening to many times over. I highly recommend you take a listen.
  • Blown Away

    5
    By classic7
    One of the best recordings I have ever heard. Listening to the Elgar Cello Concerto played on Viola, I could not help but compare the intensity to that of Jacqueline Du Pre. I own two recordings of the Schnittke Viola Concerto performed by Yuri Bashmet, and in my opinion, I believe this performance to be the definitive interpretation. I never believed a violist could have a level of technique surpassing the great violinists and cellists of our time. Six Stars- a must have for all violists and musicians.
  • Interesting take

    4
    By Boolez
    Not familiar with the Elgar Viola transcription but for some odd reason it works. Carpenter and Eschenbach work together seamlessly to make it sound as natural as possibel. The Schnittke is good although I still have a biased for the Bashmet. Still there is nothing that glaringly wrong about it to disuade you from getting it. -Bz

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