Knoxville: Summer of 1915 David Zinman, Dawn Upshaw & The Orchestra Of St. Luke's Classical Music 2005 New Songs Albums Artists Singles Videos Musicians Remixes Image

Album: Knoxville: Summer of 1915

Artist: David Zinman, Dawn Upshaw & The Orchestra Of St. Luke's

  • Genre: Classical
  • Release Date: 2005
  • Explicitness: notExplicit
  • Country: USA
  • Track Count: 9

  • Copyright: ℗ 2005 Nonesuch Records. Manufactured & Marketed by Warner Strategic Marketing

Tracklist For Knoxville: Summer of 1915 By Artist David Zinman, Dawn Upshaw & The Orchestra Of St. Luke's

Title Artist Time
1
Knoxville: Summer of 1915 David Zinman, Dawn Upshaw & The Orchestra Of St. Luke's 15:11 USD Album Only
2
What a Curse For a Woman Is a David Zinman, Dawn Upshaw & The Orchestra Of St. Luke's 4:18 USD 0.99
3
Mirabai Songs: I. It's True, I David Zinman, Dawn Upshaw & The Orchestra Of St. Luke's 2:46 USD 0.99
4
Mirabai Songs: II. All I Was D David Zinman, Dawn Upshaw & The Orchestra Of St. Luke's 2:49 USD 0.99
5
Mirabai Songs: III. Why Mira C David Zinman, Dawn Upshaw & The Orchestra Of St. Luke's 2:05 USD 0.99
6
Mirabai Songs: IV. Where Did Y David Zinman, Dawn Upshaw & The Orchestra Of St. Luke's 2:00 USD 0.99
7
Mirabai Songs: V. Clouds David Zinman, Dawn Upshaw & The Orchestra Of St. Luke's 2:54 USD 0.99
8
Mirabai Songs: VI. Don't Go, D David Zinman, Dawn Upshaw & The Orchestra Of St. Luke's 3:41 USD 0.99
9
The Rake's Progress, Act I, Sc David Zinman, Dawn Upshaw & The Orchestra Of St. Luke's 7:21 USD 0.99

Reviews For Knoxville: Summer of 1915 By Artist David Zinman, Dawn Upshaw & The Orchestra Of St. Luke's

  • An early recording of a modern American soprano.

    5
    By ssaattbb
    This recording, one of the earliest in Dawn Upshaw's career, was originally released in 1990, and clearly shows the promise of one of America's great soprano voices. Equally comfortable with a Mozart opera, or the modern songs of John Harbison, Upshaw's specialty is delivering text. As a champion of contemporary composers, Dawn Upshaw delivery a lyric phrase or a text laden aria with confidence and clarity. In this album, we see an artist at the beginning of her professional career deliver a bold choice in programming, joyously sung.
  • Knoxville: Summer of 1915 - a singers review

    4
    By bellissimasop
    This recording of Knoxville is the very best to which I’ve had the pleasure of listening. Ms. Upshaw’s voice is perfectly suited to it. It’s almost as if it were written for her. Her style, pronunciation, and technical approach are spot on, and she makes it sound easy. Trust me; this is not an easy piece to sing. I am not a big fan of the Mirabai songs themselves, but she sings them with technical aplomb. The Menotti aria is also very well done, but it is in the Stravinsky that she shows the most flexibility in dramatic approach and vocal athleticism. It is my opinion that no one sings the English language more understandably. SS
  • fantastic voice...

    4
    By DavidTFooks
    I agree with the "best Knoxville" review. Ms. Upshaw's voice is so rich and obviously well-trained, however she lacks that overly-done quality wherein every soprano sounds like they came from the same mold. Oh, and you can understand what the hell she's saying too. ;-)
  • Best Knoxville

    5
    By jaro67
    I've been looking for this recorderng forever? This is far and away the best Knoxville I've heard. Upshaw's warm tone and easy style are the perfect complement for Agee's indulgently rich prologue.
  • A fine album, but not the best Knoxville

    3
    By Ranger Jeff
    The best strategy here is just to buy the Menotti song, "What a Curse For a Woman ...". In 30 years of loving Barber's masterpiece, I still prefer the Leontyne Price version with orchestra (not the one with Barber at the piano).

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